The Gilded Century

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, August, 1941

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, August, 1941

thegildedcentury:

Life, July 24, 1944

thegildedcentury:

Life, July 24, 1944

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, August, 1941

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, August, 1941

thegildedcentury:

Life, July 27, 1944
The Bretton Woods Accord would form the basis of Keynesian fiscal policy for America and most of the industrialized west for the postwar period.  That changed during the Nixon and Ford administrations when, conspicuous consumption notwithstanding, supply began outstripping demand.  The crisis reached its head during the Carter administration, when the president challenged America to base its society on something other than greed.  He was immediately replaced by Reagan, who introduced a policy of deregulation, deficit spending, bloating the military and slashing social programs, a trend that continues to this day. 

thegildedcentury:

Life, July 27, 1944

The Bretton Woods Accord would form the basis of Keynesian fiscal policy for America and most of the industrialized west for the postwar period.  That changed during the Nixon and Ford administrations when, conspicuous consumption notwithstanding, supply began outstripping demand.  The crisis reached its head during the Carter administration, when the president challenged America to base its society on something other than greed.  He was immediately replaced by Reagan, who introduced a policy of deregulation, deficit spending, bloating the military and slashing social programs, a trend that continues to this day. 

vg-words-by-eric-thornton:

Destiny and the Hamster Wheel Blues

It is possible to kill yourself at The Tower, the hubworld in Bungie’s new video game, Destiny . All other types of violence are prohibited in The Tower, the game restricting the controls so the gun you’ve been blasting away with stays firmly affixed to your back, the fists you’ve used to pummel hundreds of enemies into oblivion staying resolutely at your sides. The only violence you’re allowed here is directed at yourself, a lesson imparted to me when I take a flying leap at The Tower’s edge and, instead of encountering an invisible wall or failing to clear the safety railing, I go sailing out into space and fall into the haze below. This is not a big deal. Death is never a big deal in Destiny, where you’re never more than 30 seconds away from a respawn, a mere fraction of the load times that Destiny takes between levels. Jump off The Tower and you’ll respawn almost immediately with a tongue in cheek diagnosis of “Death By Misadventure”, your attempt at injecting some conventional mortality into Destiny thwarted by the game’s continuing insistence that you keep going on, and on, and on. It’s as if the game is saying “Yes, that’s very cute, you can briefly end your life just as easily as we can with our hordes of Hive and Fallen and Vex, but now you must return to the serious business of getting more guns, armor, and experience. Chop, chop!” There is no shortage of eye candy in Destiny, but the game so determinedly pushes you forward, with so little substantial story underlying any of it, that you feel actively discouraged from taking any time to wonder at it all. In Destiny all the grandeur of space and time are laid before you in their awe and majesty, phenomena you and your fellow players are encouraged to ignore in favor of running endless errands. It can feel like you’re one worker in a colony of ants ignorantly swarming over the surface of a masterpiece, a lingering sense of knowledge ignored and mystery squandered. The game even has its own avatar of grand, majestic futility embodied in The Traveler, the huge alien orb that hangs inert over mankind’s last city like a great, futuristic malfunctioning disco ball.

(Link To Full Story)

thegildedcentury:

Amazing Stories, May, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Amazing Stories, May, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 18, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 18, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 18, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 18, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, March, 1948

thegildedcentury:

Fantastic Adventures, March, 1948

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 25, 1946

thegildedcentury:

Life, February 25, 1946